Move Over Warframe… There’s a New Game in Town…And It’s Chinese.

A Look At Genshin Impact

Seth Underwood

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Picture Taken From My Own Gameplay of Genshin Impact.

miHoYo released Genshin Impact this past September 28, 2020. In twelve days, it grossed over $100 million, and “was the biggest release of any Chinese video game” to date.

Genshin Impact is not miHoYo’s first game. Founded in 2012 by three university students, the company focused on the Chinese mobile market. The entertainment company, based in Shanghai, has several other games, all with a love of the anime art style.

Because of China’s censorship policies, there’s been some controversy with the Genshin’s release into international markets. On the bottom of their own company profile page there’s this odd message for a business- “Dear friend and citizens, the Shanghai Police’s anti-fraud dissuasion telephone number ‘962110’ is specifically designed to prevent your property from being defrauded and damaged. Please answer the call as soon as you receive it.”

Now I can’t prove this as being related or not, but shortly after I paid for the game’s $4.99 Blessing of Welkin Moon pass, I got this spam call in what sounded like Chinese. Does the Chinese Government have all my personal information linked to my credit card number? Were they trying to dissuade me? It’s a little too late for that as the company already has my money. And if my credit card company thought this was fraud, they would have blocked it like they always do after calling me. I’ve always wondered about these odd spam calls you get soon after doing something online. Not that they are connected, but in today’s age it makes you wonder.

Genshin Impact Will Beat Warframe

Both Warframe and Genshin Impact depend upon the Chinese gaming market for its life blood. Digital Extremes, the developers of Warframe, is still owned by Leyou (even though Leyou is supposed to be bought out by Tencent). Statista.com reports that China has “as of the early of 2020, approximately 532 million” people “engaged in online gaming”. Whereas 60% of Americans are playing video games daily right now. That’s only 198 million people in comparison. Even if the entire U.S. played video games, we couldn’t even come close to the Chinese market size. The U.S. may have money, but China makes up for it in…

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Seth Underwood

54+ autistic, undiagnosed dyslexic, sufferer of chronic migraines, writer of dark science fiction, player of video games and Mike Pondsmith Fan. Race- Human.